Archive for the Fresh from the Web Category

Over the last several years, the Internet has shifted from a secondary spot to the prime place to post your resume and search for jobs. Though that may differ depending on the industry, overall it’s a transparent trend. That means it’s important to create a resume that includes keywords that potential employers are interested in.

Mktg Ladder Top 100 List That’s where MktgLadder can help. They provide a list of the top 100 words that recruiters are searching for on the web. Remember that though this is a great list to start with you need to actually have the experience to back it up and the context to place it. A random list of keywords added into a resume won’t get you anywhere, and it will only serve to irritate recruiters.

Good luck!

Have you ever thought about an idea or heard something in the news that made you wonder how many people it would affect?  Or maybe you’re thinking about moving and would like to know a little bit about the people in your new home in comparison to where you live now.

ZIPskinny.com Home Page Census.gov has lots of great information, but it takes a few clicks to find anything digestible. That’s where ZIPskinny steps in. On the first screen it asks for a ZIP code.  After that you’ll see a screen with lots of demographics alongside several graphs.  It’s a quick way to get a good feel for the makeup of any ZIP code in the database.

But it gets better. ZIPskinny then allows you to enter multiple ZIP codes and provides a side-by-side analysis of each area’s demographics.  For example in my area I found out that single people are much more common than I thought.  Keep in mind that this data is from the 2000 census.

Happy data mining!

A couple of times every month I usually make some new business contacts outside of the traditional office context.  That means I’m usually writing down their e-mail address on a napkin or other spare piece of paper.  More than I’d like to admit, I either hear them wrong or can’t read parts of my own writing.

Verify E-mail Address Logo If you ever run into the same problem, Verify E-Mail Address may help.  When you enter the e-mail address of someone trying to contact the site pings the server and makes sure that the address is valid. What does that mean for you?  One less bounced e-mail, and the peace of mind knowing that a stranger isn’t receiving your message.

Keep in mind though, that if someone else has that e-mail address registered you’ll still receive a verified message.

Last week I ran into a problem.  I have a computer that’s six months old and looking at my drive properties I discovered that I only have 40% free space left on a 200 GB hard drive.  After clicking through a maze of directories trying to identify where the largest space eaters were for about five minutes I decided to search for a better way.

WinDirStat ScreenshotEventually I discovered WinDirStat. It’s a free utility that scans your hard drive and represents files and folders graphically.  Each folder is represented by a rectangle with smaller rectangles inside it. Each rectangle drawn as one constant gradient represents a single file, and that makes it easy to identify which files and folders are taking up the most space.

WinDirStat allows you to click on each rectangle and zoom in further for more detail.  On the top pane it provides percentages for each file and folder, and there are also some color coding options.

Here’s to keeping your hard drive clean!

Today I discovered something pretty exciting, it’s a company that provides free conference calling. FreeConferenceCall.com runs with a prevalent business practice on the web, providing a free service that will hopefully persuade users to upgrade with additional for-pay features. Nonetheless their free conference calling is a great way to connect with a lot of people quickly and easily, without the investment.

FreeConferenceCall.com When testing the system, the only advertisement I noticed is an opening statement indicating that FreeConferenceCall.com is hosting the call. I was also surprised to learn that they support conference call recordings, and you can download the recording in .wav format.

It looks like some users were abusing the system because they require everyone to reregister every 120 days. If you’d rather have a 1-800 number they also support that for a fee.

If you’re looking a way to connect with a lot of business contacts or friends at once, this is it.

I publish files for a variety of web sites and it can become overwhelming to keep track of which files are up-to-date on the remote server. Surfing the web for a better solution last week I discovered WinSCP. It’s a free FTP client (though donations are welcome) that includes the ability to synchronize files between a local folder and a remote FTP server.

WinSCP That’s a pretty awesome because if you’re anything like me the local folders stay organized but the remote server gets pretty messy. This way it’s as easy as navigating to the relevant folder and choosing synchronize.

Another great feature is the ability to synchronize browsing. That means whenever you browse to a directory locally, the equivalent folder will open remotely.

Here are a list of features from their site:

  • Graphical user interface
  • Translated into several languages
  • Integration with Windows (drag&drop, URL, shortcut icons)
  • U3 support
  • All common operations with files
  • Support for SFTP and SCP protocols over SSH-1 and SSH-2 and plain old FTP protocol
  • Batch file scripting and command-line interface
  • Directory synchronization in several semi or fully automatic ways
  • Integrated text editor
  • Support for SSH password, keyboard-interactive, public key and Kerberos (GSS) authentication
  • Integrates with Pageant (PuTTY authentication agent) for full support of public key authentication with SSH
  • Windows Explorer-like and Norton Commander-like interfaces
  • Optionally stores session information
  • Optionally supports standalone operation using a configuration file in place of registry entries, suitable for operation from removable media

Part of being human is to seek interaction with other humans. Usually that means as we move through life we build relationships with a growing number of people. Maybe you use Microsoft’s Outlook or Google’s Gmail to organize your contact information, and maybe you have a separate set of contacts for your professional life and personal life. What happens then if for some reason you need to call a friend from work (maybe a new job opportunity, social event, or emergency)? On the flip side what if you need access to professional contacts when you’re away from the office to move a project or idea forward?

image With that sort of arrangement it’s difficult to pull information from the separated contact management systems. Meet Plaxo. They’re in the business of combining all of those contacts into one manageable interface that’s accessible anywhere.

Beyond that advantage, it acts as a social network that lets all of your contacts update their own information. That way you never lose touch with contacts — unless you choose to.

It also provides some nice features like easy searching, instant messaging, click to call, and integrated mapping.

If you’re looking for a better way to manage your contacts it’s worth checking out, and it’s free.

Today an unusual site caught my attention. Not because it seems immediately useful though there’s potential for that. It’s called MyDrawings and the idea is that everyone shares one canvas that stretches on forever. Just scroll to a blank area and start editing. Note that to edit the canvas, registration is required.

Graffiti Snapshot While at first glance this might seem like a purely whimsical pursuit, I see a new potential avenue for artist advertisement and perhaps eventually a way for illustrators to discover more specifically what draws the human eye.

The canvas works just like Google Maps, with the ability to click and drag to new areas of the “graffiti map”. I can also see this being a source of inspiration for writers looking for a prompt.

On a larger level this electronic canvas captures the diversity of human perception.

If you work with PDF documents regularly then maybe you’re already aware of batches in Acrobat and what a life-saver they can be. I’d like to take that a step in a different direction and enable PDF manipulation directly from Windows Explorer.

PDF-ShellTools does just that, it adds a section to your right click menu in Windows Explorer with a lot of functionality. I use it to set open options for lots of PDFs at once without opening Acrobat. It’s also been very helpful in adding or viewing metadata. Did I mention it’s free?

Here are a list of features copied from their site:

  • PDF-Anonymize – Remove all the metadata traces from the PDF files.
  • PDF-Split/Extract – Extract pages, or range of pages, into new PDF documents.
  • PDF-Merge/Rearrange – Merge several PDF documents, or rearrange source file pages structure, into a new PDF document.
  • PDF-Insert/Append – Insert one, or more, documents pages after, or before, a specified page number of another PDF document.
  • PDF-Attachments – Add, remove, consult and extract PDF file attachments.
  • PDF-Set Open Options – Configure the initial view of PDF documents. Can set, full screen mode, initial page, initial magnification, layout, page mode, etc.
  • PDF-Set/Reset Password Security – Control the access to the PDF documents contents using password protection.
  • PDF-Stamp/Watermark – Stamp text, images and shapes into PDF documents pages.
  • PDF-Extract Text Content – Extract the PDF documents text content into text files.
  • PDF-Renamer – Rename, and organize by folders, the PDF documents using its metadata information as source to compose the file name or folder structure.

image Everyone has a topic they’re passionate about. Whether it’s talking about combating global warming or brewing a perfect latte, opinions can be difficult to share with larger groups and finding an interested audience is one way to make sizeable impacts.

Here’s a platform to make that easier. Change.org allows its members to post information about things they’d like to change and these are published publicly. There are also ratings of popular (or unpopular depending on who you ask) politicians and nonprofits, records of what actions members are taking, and a mechanism to donate toward causes.

Lots of people are talking about how the Internet is connecting presidential hopefuls more directly with their audiences and this is another great example of that same concept in action. Change.org provides a summary of what its online population is thinking and will only become more accurate as more people join the community.